Monday, 22 May 2017

MY FAVOURITE PHOTOGRAPH at The Montefiore.


Well, just one week to go and it has been fun. I have recently taken some friends and my twin sister, Sally to the exhibition and they have all enjoyed it. As you can see from the composite picture above, there is such a variety of images and means of approaching the same subject - me. But not only that, each photograph is excellent. Each time I put a photograph up I held it in front of me and thought, "this is a great photograph!" and then, once they were all up, I thought "Wow!" A question that has been asked of me a lot over the last few weeks is "How do you feel seeing so many photographs of yourself?" It is strange but I feel quite separate from them - obviously, my face is familiar to me but it is almost like looking at someone else. However, when I look at them all, I feel a great sense of pride that I have managed to bring all these superb artists together and I find it incredibly moving that they have each worked so hard to produce an amazing image.

The other question often asked is "Which is your favourite?" Well, I can now reveal the one I like best - it is (drum roll) the one top left by Mike McCartney. I love him, I loved the shoot and I love the picture with Peter Pan in the background. Yep, that's the one! Although, I quite like the Rankin one next to it. What a day that was - nice chap and good fun and a great shot. Sorry, Mike it's the Rankin. Mm, actually, can I change my mind because Steve Bloom's pic (3rd from left, top row) is bloody good and it got into the final exhibition at the Taylor Wessing Prize in the National Portrait Gallery. No. it has to be Steve's - yes, that is it. And yet, and yet, I have always had a soft spot for the next one, "Beautiful Decay" by the lovely Danielle Tunstall - oh, Steve, I am sure you will understand that and accept that this is a fantastic shot taken by someone who, at the time, had only owned a camera for two years and had to wait for the kids to go to sleep before she could work on her images and she is the sweetest person as well. Congratulations! The number one! But, no, how can I choose that and ignore the next one with the dinosaur. Clayton, so generous with is time and so imaginative in creating his final image. I LOVE this. How could I have chosen anything else? There we are - I feel so much better having chosen the one.

Look, I must apologise but what about Tanya Simpson's shot of me in the sea on Portobello beach in Scotland or Jeronimo Sanz' manipulated image of my self portraits or Henrietta Bowden-Jones' photo or Jim Stephenson's brilliantly funny one of me rolled up in the backdrop? Yes, "Cadbury's Dairy Milk" by Robert Ludlow. Yes! No! I've made my mind up  - it's definitely Cat Lane's "Under the Pier" well, either that or me on the railway line photographed by the gorgeous Jacqui Booth but then there is Hannah Lucy Jones' polaroid. No, enough of this, my favourite is....Kathy Foote's underwater shot - full of colour and light! But for goodness' sake, it has to be Nigel Maudsley's beautiful "Distant" but even he might agree that "Fitzrovia Chapel" by Claude Savona should be chosen given the connections to my family. Ok, Erika Szostak's "No Expectations" featuring the incredible make up by Elloise Willetts. At last! Well, I'm glad that's sorted.......except Viveca Koh's shot of me and her cat, Milo, will always be my number one. Amanda Harman I...er.. have to tell you that my favourite photo in this show is yours! It is the one of me on the beach at West Wittering, my childhood home - next to the best one of all by Lenka Rayn H. However, talking of beaches, Max Langran took that excellent shot of me "Early One Morning" - that eclipses everything else, Max - well done - if it wasn't for Steve Segasby's pic, you would have been my favourite but even Steve would stand aside for the gorilla suit by Jay Brooks or "Comfort " by the lovely Gemma Day or "Three Colours Tim" by Amit Lennon........or maybe the superb B & W study by Daniel Regan? No, forget it - I have just looked again at "Limpid Flight" by Elaine Perks but how would her colleague Tess Hurrell feel? Doesn't matter  because I have just realised that "Eloquence" by Tess is my special one. Thanks Tess.

What am I thanking Tess for? It is magnificent image but, talking of hands, look at "Jamais" by Itziar Olaberria - it wins, hands down! if it wasn't for the photo taken by Strat Mastoris on the beach - you know, the one of me reading the Guardian but, come on, Cathy Pyle's "Light and Dark" take a bow, my favourite photograph in the show! Take a Bow? Hang on - Ben Smith - how can I ignore this? Well, I have to because of Katariina Jarvinen's silky smooth "Silent Moment". But what about the noise coming from The Wet Plate Collodion method applied by the handsome Nicolas Laborie??
Well, no more noise than is coming from under the black cloth supplied by Ameena Rojee - you cannot hide class can you, Matt Finn? A class act. And that is what in my mind speaks so loudly from Michela Griffith and Denise Myers or is it Dave Wares? Some sunset, Dave - you win or you would have but for "Control" by Anja Barte Telin & Moa Thörneby. So, where were we? Oh yes, Mike McCar......I can't choose a favourite and do you know why? Because they are all my favourites and I have loved every minute of every shoot.

Thank you, Montefiore (Sandeep, Gavin and Tom). Thank you Keely Harrison for the great publicity - see especially the feature on BBC TV - https://vimeo.com/218429539. Thank you Alex Bamford for the labels, Julia Horbaschk for chairing the discussion on 14th May, my wife Jane for her support and forbearance, Parkinson's UK for the frames  and Parkinson's Disease itself, without which NONE of this would have happened. Amen.

Monday, 15 May 2017

OVER THE HILL: A PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNEY

OVER THE HILL by Roberto Foddai

          
‘Alright boys, this is it, over the hill’ is the intro of the song “Bring on Lucie” by John Lennon and, although the phrase ‘over the hill’ has somewhat negative connotations, it is announced on the record in a very positive way by Lennon who goes on to sing ‘Do it, do it, do it, do it now!’ and so, for me, the title of this exhibition is optimistic despite the double meaning.

In May 2007, I answered an advertisement in Time Out from Graeme Montgomery, whom I know now to be an extremely talented professional photographer. He was compiling a book of nudes and wanted to photograph the first 100 people to answer the advert so I thought ‘why not?’ and went along and found that I was number one! Strangely enough, two other photographers advertised in the following two issues of Time Out, this time for people to pose for portraits, and they both photographed me subsequently. That was that for a while until, in February 2008, I answered an advert in our local newspaper from a student, Daisy Lang, who wanted to photograph people with illnesses for her final year’s project. Subsequently, I discovered that there were many photographers advertising on the Internet for models for particular projects. I wrote an email to the first photographer explaining that I was 57 and had Parkinson’s Disease and that ‘I wanted to continue on my path of being photographed by different people during the course of my illness’. Suddenly, as I wrote those words, I realised that I had my own project.

Since then, over 400 different photographers have photographed and filmed me and it has been incredibly interesting and exciting as I have seen the project develop day by day. I have met many wonderful, skilful people many of whom, normally, I would never have met let alone spent several hours with them.

It has been a fascinating journey. I have always loved photography but never had the patience or skill to practice it successfully. However, being a model has enabled me to collaborate with brilliant practitioners of the art and to be part of the artistic photographic process.

I decided on "Over the Hill" as the title of the project in January 2009 but I had not discussed this with anyone until I met Roberto Foddai a few weeks later to talk about his ideas for our shoot. He produced two pieces of headgear he wanted me to wear and said that one of them had some wording on it which he felt was somewhat ironic. He turned it over and on the front were the words  – ‘Over the Hill’.
Free the people, now.
Do it, do it, do it, do it now.

Tim Andrews


TODAY - 14th May 2017


Today was a grand day.

It started early – I woke up at about 3am and then turned over and tried to sleep but I only dozed and then became fully awake when I thought I heard someone other than me breathing in the room.

I got up and watched the repeat of “Match of the Day” from the night before. It was a little taste of what was to come later, the match against Manchester United  - the last ever game at the old Tottenham ground at White Hart Lane. My beloved Tottenham.

Jane wasn’t feeling well and so she couldn't come to the Forum Discussion event at the Montefiore Hospital as part of the exhibition of “Over the Hill”. In the meantime, I ironed a shirt and got ready to go. It had rained during the night and early morning but, as I stepped out of the house, it was sunny and everything felt fresh and clean and washed as I drove to the Hospital. I parked outside and was about to cross the road when I was tooted by Julia Horbaschk and her husband, Mark in their flash black 4x4 which they had been given as a courtesy car whilst their own car was being repaired.




I love Julia. She can be wonderfully loud and outspoken at times but it all comes from a good place as she is a very warm, gentle and caring person and very funny too. Mark is a very lucky man and I am proud to call them my friends. I entered the reception area of the hospital and the photographs looked good – some of the frames and labels were slightly wonky but, for some reason, I did not want to straighten them up.

Julia, me and Katariina

I was met by the lovely Tom Collins, who has been so helpful in preparing and hanging the exhibition, and he had already started moving the sofas to clear the space for the discussion. We gradually got everything set up and Nicolas Laborie arrived looking very handsome followed by Cathy Pyle, looking very beautiful. Gavin Weal, the hospital’s commercial manager, stopped by to say a quick hello. He had not intended to do so but I suppose he couldn’t help himself. He looks after the place very well.


The discussion went very well. Not all the people who had booked came but that meant it was an intimate chat and between I guess about 16 or so people. Each of the photographers spoke about their experience of working with me and it was then that I began to feel awkward but nicely awkward. I felt that a fuss was being made about me and yet it was the work of the photographers which made the project what it was. We ended the discussion with the slideshow of the images set to Madness’ song “House of Fun” and everyone applauded. It had been a lovely couple of hours and in some way, validated my decision to end the project. I said earlier that I wanted to put it into a box, tie ribbon around it and put it up on to a shelf and then bring it down every so often to wonder at the lovely times I had had with these people. And today was just such an experience. I opened the box and the magic created by the project burst out and sprinkled over the audience like fairy dust. People said some very kind things but I could not have done it without them.

Me and Viveca

Viveca Koh had come and thought that I had not recognised her but I had and she joined us at the pub later with Katariina Jarvinen, Julia, Mark and the Wares family (Dave’s photograph is in the show). We had a drink and chatted about this and that and then went out separate ways. I returned to my car with Viveca and she gave me the warmest and huggiest of hugs. I drove home feeling wonderful.


Then I sat down to watch Spurs and, as usual, they put me through the ringer. They played pretty well but almost let United come back from the dead but, in the end, they hung on. . The noise made by the crowd was deafening and then, at the end, the pitch was invaded and it took some time for the fans to be persuaded back to their seats. Then, as the rain poured down, they announced a long line of former players, Berbatov, Hoddle, Steve Archibald, Garth Crooks, Tony Galvin, Terry Dyson and Terry Medwin (both of whom I have interviewed) Martin Chivers, Alan Gilzean, the Allens (Les, his son Clive and his nephew Paul), Pat Jennings, Erik Thorsvedt, Gary Mabbutt, Mike England, Phil Beal, Ardiles and Villa, Cliff Jones, Jimmy Robertson, Joe Kinnear, Alan Neilsen, John Pratt, Mark Falco, Justin Edinburgh, Micky Hazard, and loads more. I called Jane into the room as a tenor began to sing ”Glory, Glory, Hallejuliah” and the crowd joined in as tears ran down my face (as they are doing now as I write this) and I said my own goodbye to this wonderful ground, where I have had so many happy times..


But the day wasn’t over yet. It finished with a speech at the Bafta TV Award ceremony given by Joanna Lumley who was awarded the fellowship. She had been preceded by some lovely contributions by Michael McIntire (who seems to have a genuinely nice and happy soul), Phoebe Waller-Bridge and Sarah Lancashire, who in her speech thanked her fellow nominee, Claire Foy, for giving her the best ten years underneath the duvet. But it was what Lumley said and the way she said it which made my day. She brought the whole audience together in her arms and said “I love you”


And, as my character, Alice from Paris says, “When people ask me what is the greatest thing in life, ‘Love’ is the answer”.

Yes, it was a grand day.